children
Three Most Common Household Products That Poison Children
19 July 2016 | (No Comments)

1. Cosmetics/ Personal Care Products (15%)
2. Household Cleaning Substances (11%)
3. Analgesics/painkillers (10%)

1. Cosmetics/ Personal Care Products (15%)

The largest source of poisoning comes from cosmetics and personal care products like shampoos and substances with ethanol (like hand sanitizers) or hydrogen peroxide. Many of these products are easy to access in a home for children, placed in unlocked locations like bathroom cupboards and in purses. Because of their bright colors and the simplicity of opening them, they can be ingested easily and should be handled with some caution. Cosmetics are not usually thought of as dangerous but they can create many serious health issues in the wrong hands!

2. Household Cleaning Substances (11%)

Some of the most powerful potential poisons are the chemical products used to keep your house clean. While maintaining a clean home, especially in bathrooms and kitchens, can be an important step to staying healthy, some products used in improper or accidental ways can be very dangerous. Cleaning products contain strong chemicals like bleach and ammonia that can cause problems with skin, eyes, soft tissue, and breathing if inhaled, ingested, or spilled.

It is especially important to be careful using products that need to soak over long periods of time, like carpet cleaners. When these products sit out, they can be breathed or ingested easily by animals or small children, who are closer to the floor. To help combat these dangers it is vital to educate yourself by reading labels and products reviews thoroughly and by choosing products with fewer harmful chemicals. Products that are derived from plant products are not automatically safer, but can help reduce exposure to certain well known and very harmful chemicals like bleach and ammonia.

3. Analgesics/painkillers (10%)

Some of the products meant to reduce pain can cause a lot more trouble when they aren’t used properly. This is especially true when young children think that colorful and unusually shaped medicines are candies. Overdosing on painkillers can cause a number of problems including intestinal distress and liver damage. This depends heavily on the type of medicine that is accidentally ingested, so be sure to learn about products before you use them and contact a professional doctor or poison control specialist if the label recommends.

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